Yugioh has hundreds of distinct cards; in fact, there may be one or two million by this point.

With its regular booster set releases, Konami has created archetype after archetype.

A lot of cards end up on eBay or in the trash if you neglect the archetypes and epic singles.

These cards are essentially useless because they don’t add anything to any deck and take too much time to set up even if you want to use them.

Here is a list of the top 18 worst Yugioh cards ever.

18. Nanana

A level seven or higher monster receives 700 more ATK/DEF for the turn from Nanana.

Use “Rush Recklessly” for 700 more ATK, or “The Reliable Guardian” for more DEF.

Even while those spells aren’t very good, at least they don’t have restrictions on the kinds of monsters you can use them on, and they can be used quickly, allowing you to cast them during your opponent’s turn.

Furthermore, Nanana is further embarrassed by stat-boosting to equip spells like “Mage Power” and “United We Stand.”

17. The Pyro Clock of Destiny.

The turn count is advanced by one by Pyro Clock, but not the turn itself. Less than 20 cards are affected by this, and many of them, like “Swords of Revealing Light,” are ones you wouldn’t want to play unless your opponent uses them, which you can’t predict.

The ideal use is with “Final Countdown,” which triumphs after 20 turns.

However, this use is currently restricted and simply performs better with delay strategies like “Waboku” and “Battle Fader.”

16. Gamble

Gamble is aptly titled, but it’s just too dangerous to employ consistently. First off, it’s challenging to activate because your opponent needs at least six cards and you need at least two (which is rare).

Gamble then flips a coin, and if you correctly predicted the outcome, you draw cards until you have five in your hand.

While that is a fantastic advantage, doing it incorrectly completely skips your next turn, which is a severe punishment that will almost certainly lose you the fight.

15. An Unlucky Report

An bad report compels your adversary to repeat their subsequent battle phase. Of course, you have to exercise caution here lest you unintentionally provide them with the means to prevail through consecutive attacks.

Also Read:  29 Awesome JoJo’s Bizarre Adventure Poses

Report is only useful when you have cards like “Yubel” in play that activate when your opponent attacks.

Even then, unless you utilize forced-attack cards like “Yang Zing Unleashed,” your opponent can simply choose not to attack.

Too much work for too little reward, particularly given the chance of being invaded twice in a single turn.

14. Card shuffle

With this continuous spell, you can shuffle your deck or your opponent’s deck once every turn for a cost of 300 life points.

Although 300 health is not a significant cost, it adds up, and in most circumstances, shuffles are useless because you are substituting one unknown for another.

Shuffle can be combined with “Convulsion of Nature,” which flips each deck over and reveals your next draw, but are you willing to run two unfavorable cards for a subpar combination? neither do I.

13. The Gift of Greed

Your opponent draws two cards after receiving the advantage of Pot of Greed thanks to Gift of Greed.

Any card game needs to have a hand advantage, so why give them such a big edge?

There are much superior mill cards like “Needle Worm” that send cards to your opponent’s graveyard if you’re aiming to mill their deck and win via a forced deck-out (a safer zone to stock).

12. Dark Sage

The Dark Mage can be special summoned from your hand or deck, has good combat stats (especially his 3200 DEF), and when he shows up, you can search for a spell in your deck.

What then is the issue? He is difficult to summon because you have to call the coin toss properly (which has a 50% chance) and activate the Time Wizard effect while under the control of Dark Magician.

Sage won’t appear until you field two specified monsters, one of which requires two tributes to normally summon, and you succeed in a luck-based mechanic.

Also keep in mind that Time Wizard’s effect, which should be at least 1500 with both Wizard and Magician fielded, destroys all of your monsters and deals damage to you equal to half their ATK if your coin toss fails.

Try retrieving spells from your graveyard with “Dark Magician of Chaos” rather than using Sage to search for them.

11. Sparks

Sparks deals your opponent 200 effect damage. Good news—all you need to win is 40 copies of this card.

Since “Poison of the Old Man” deals four times as much damage at instant speed, compare Sparks to this infinitely greater effect damage card.

10. Dancing Elf

Some formerly weak common monsters, such as “Skull Servant,” were given their own archetype to assist justify their use.

Dancing Elf, on the other hand, gets to vanish forever into obscurity.

Also Read:  How Many Devil Fruits Are There?

There is no need to ever employ her because both of her battle numbers are pitifully low and cannot reach zero (which would be more desirable due to supports with zero stats like “Masked Chameleon”).

9. Dark Artist

Even though cards like Dancing Elf are terrible, at least they may be supported by common monsters.

Here, Dark Artist delivers weak battle stats and a negative effect that reduces your defense, which is already weak, by half when a light-attributed monster attacks.

No standard monster synergy, low stats, and a bad impact.

8. Darkness Approaches

Darkness used to give the extremely unusual effect of turning a monster into a face-down attacker, but a recent errata only makes this adjustment.

In any case, it’s a terrible card because using it requires you to discard two cards, which takes three cards out of your hand altogether, just to change a monster to face-down defense mode.

Additionally, Darkness hasn’t held up well over time given that link monsters can’t switch to defense mode (face-up or face-down).

Try “Book of Moon” instead, which delivers the same effect but at quick-play speed and with no discard cost (restricted as of this writing).

7. Appointer of the Red Lotus

Here is a much worse rendition of the forbidden spell “Confiscation.” You must spend 2000 life points as the price and disclose every card in your hand.

You then take a look at your opponent’s hand and exile a card until their subsequent end step.

Although having knowledge of your opponent’s hand is useful, they also have knowledge of yours, and as a result, you lose 1/4 of your beginning health.

Try “Lightforce Sword” as an alternative to Lotus, a trap that has no downsides and banishes a random card from your opponent’s hand for four of their turns.

6. The Humble Sentry

You are hit by two drawbacks when using Humble Sentry. In the beginning, it shows your opponent your complete hand.

A card from your hand is then shuffled into the deck. That’s all, then!

When a card that can only be special summoned from the deck (like “Stardust Dragon/Assault Mode”) is prematurely drawn, you can use Sentry to reset it, although there are better ways to accomplish the same goal (“Edge Imp Sabres,” “Plaguespreader Zombie,” etc.).

5. Perfectly Ultimate Great Moth

The 3500 ATK of Moth is remarkable, especially considering the early stages of development.

But a monster is only useful if you can call it, and fielding Moth takes a lot of work. You must attribute “Petit Moth” at least six turns after donning “Cocoon of Evolution” in order to special summon him from your hand.

It takes a whopping seven turns to accomplish this with three particular cards, giving your opponent plenty of time to locate a removal before Moth shows up, if not to win outright.

Also Read:  Everything about Rocks Pirates in One Piece

4. Gate Keeper

Similar to Moth, Guardian has excellent combat abilities but is incredibly challenging to summon.

He cannot be normal summoned or set; instead, you must tribute a “Sanga of the Thunder,” “Kazejin,” and “Suijin” you control in order to special summon him from your hand.

Each of these out-of-date monsters costs two tributes to normally summon.

Fielding all three at once while the guardian is in your possession isn’t feasible, and even if he shows up, the guardian doesn’t have any defenses to prevent a simple removal.

3. Hungry Burger

The majority of ritual spells today reach numerous powerful ritual monsters. However, the early ritual monsters were notoriously terrible because many of them lacked any skills and required particular ritual spells.

Therefore, to raise the level of your unit, you would need both cards in your hand and ready tributes from your hand or field.

In the instance of Hungry Burger, you have to give up at least six-level monsters in order to defeat a monster with 2000 ATK that has no special abilities and can be defeated by almost any tributed unit in the game.

He also has a strange typo, sounding more like a devil than a warrior.

2. Neo Bubbleman

Neo’s main redeeming traits are that he destroys any monster he battles after calculating damage and that his name changes to ordinary “Elemental HERO Bubbleman” while fielded (helpful for fusion summoning).

But you can only use the spell “Metamorphosis” to special summon him by banishing Bubbleman from your field and doing so.

This calls for a number of specific cards for a weak unit whose effects are hardly significant because he will probably lose his first combat.

Neo is currently practically unplayable due to the ban on Metamorphosis, and even if it weren’t, you’d be trading a really good card for a really awful one.

1. Black Metal Dragon

Nice name, indeed. Sure, decent ATK. However, summoning Black Metal requires tributing your “Red-Eyes B. Dragon” with the trap “Metalmorph” equipped.

Your Red-Eyes would already have 2700 ATK thanks to Metalmorph (and would gain more upon attacking a monster), so you’re actually just weakening yourself.

Additionally, this exact condition depends on having two specific cards played.

It’s also odd because you can summon Black Metal from your deck, yet he is absolutely useless when drawn because you can’t cast him from your hand. Instead, try playing cards like “Red-Eyes Darkness Metal Dragon.”


Help Us Improve: Rate this Article

/ 5

This Article Rating: